Oral Histories

  • Interview

    Duha Salim was born in Jordan, but grew up in Puerto Rico before coming to the United States. She identifies as a Muslim American-Palestinian woman, and relates most strongly with Arab culture. Duha Salim considers herself an outsider, because she feels like she cannot advocate for herself, fearing that she will be viewed badly. She feels that she can express her true identity with friends and family. Duha Salim currently works as a DJ and is pursuing higher education at Cardinal Stritch University, where she is studying nursing.
  • Interview

    This interview with Mrs. Doua Ibraheem highlights the experience of an Arab-Muslim woman in the U.S.A. She narrates her experiences and opinions on immigration, family, religion, education, vocation, community, and the consequent relationships among these facets of life. Religion reinforced her self-identity and progressively became important in her life. This led to the successful assimilation into American culture. Her answers support the statement that being a Muslim is far more important to her than being an Arab, an American, or an Arab-American.
  • Interview

    The respondent is a Syrian man from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He is a small business-owner, teaches at a local university/college, and is currently completing a PhD. He has a teenage child and two other children who are young adults (one is a female who suffers from high anxiety). He also discussed his own sports-related injury. He offered perspectives on how these issues are treated in the United States and Middle East. Although he had never witnessed discrimination against himself or his family related to differences in ability, he noted the importance of giving as much care as you can, and how in predominantly Muslim countries care towards differences in ability is not publicly displayed. He describes care as a strongly familial practice, but he emphasizes that people need to understand the stresses that other people endure in order to better accommodate their needs.
  • Interview

    This individual, a female from Palestine, who lived in Jordan for 10 years before migrating to the United States in 1991. She is currently caring for a family member, her son, with mental illness, specifically depression and schizophrenia. Her family has been unable to provide proper care for this individual because he is refusing care. He currently lives at home with the interviewee. She discusses her own coping mechanisms as a caregiver and the social effects of her son's illness on her, her family, and his future. She also speaks about the stigma surrounding disabilities and mental illness.
  • Interview

    The respondent is a Palestinian woman from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She and her husband have one teenager and four young adults. The second oldest son suffers from paralysis as a result of spina bifida. She is a leader and activist in the Milwaukee Muslim community and runs a non-profit. She discussed her life as a mother, caregiver, and community activist. Although she experienced a lot of emotional difficulties with handling all of her children and her son with differences in abilities, she notes that neither she nor her son has experienced any negative perceptions or discrimination based on her son’s disabilities. She does note, however, that although family and friends are helpful for providing logistical and emotional support, formal respite care is something that people in Milwaukee need desperately to care for these children, Palestine, United States
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